Antike, Glanzpunkte der Sammlung griechischer und romischer Kunst aus dem Hause Hessen (Fulda 2005)

Antike, Glanzpunkte der Sammlung griechischer und romischer Kunst aus dem Hause Hessen (Fulda 2005)

On the identification of Bruno Iulius and his portrait typology (“Adolphseck-Malibu” type), I agree essentially with Klaus Fittschen (1987) 215-17

Kersauson, K. de. Catalogue des portraits romains I: Portraits de la Republique et d’epoque Julio-Claudienne (Musee du Louvre) (Paris 1986).

Pekary, Tau. Das romische Kaiserbildnis mediante Staat, Kult und Gesellschaft dargestellt anhand der Schriftquellen (Das romische Herrscherbild 3) (Berlin 1985).

Pollini, J. “Man or God: Divine Assimilation and Substitut sopra the Late Republic and Early Principate,” in Between Republic and Pigiare: Interpretations of Augustus and His Principate, edd. K.Per. Raaflaub and M. Toher (Berkeley 1990) 333-63.

Pollini, J. “The Capolavoro Augustea: Ideology, Rhetorical Imagery, and the Creation of verso Dynastic Nararive, in Narrative and Event in Ancient Art (Cambridge 1993), ed. P.J. Holliday (Cambridge 1993) 258-98.

Pollini, J. From Republic to Pigiare: Rhetoric, Religion, and Power con the Visual Culture of Ancient Rome (Norman, Okla. 2012).

Richter, G.M.Verso. The Portraits of the Greeks I (Ithaca 1965) 109-119; The Portraits of the Greeks (abridged and revised by R.R.R. Smith) (Oxford 1984) 198-204.

Sargent, M.L. and R.H. Therkildsen, “The Technical Investigation of Sculptural Polychromy at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek 2009-2010 – An Outline’,” con J.S. Ostergaard, e., Tracking Colour. The polychromy of Greek and Roman Sculpture sopra the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek. Preliminary Report 2 (Copenhagen 2010); also online:

Footnotes

See Chapter VIII, “The ‘Insanity’ of Caligula or the ‘Insanity’ of the Jews? Differences durante Perception and Religious Beliefs,” mediante Pollini (2012) 369-411. For the confusion between worshiping the Genius or Numen of the living Princeps (emperor) and worshiping the living person, see also sopra this same sistema Chapter VII, “The Smaller Corte (‘Vicomagistri’) Reliefs and Imperial Julio-Claudian Imperial Altars: Limitations of the Evidence and Problems in Interpretation,” 309-68.

See, for example, Wilkinson (2005), especially his excellent concluding chapter (187-94) “Inventing the Mad Emperor, ” and Winterling (2011). For verso different point of view, see durante this symposium Vasily Rudich’s paper, “On the Reputation of Little-Boots.”

There has been little agreement in the past on the cast of characters on this great cameo. See now especially Megow (1987) 202-207 (cat. A 85) pls. 32.5-10, 33.1-5; Boschung (1989) 64-68; Giard (1998); Giuliani and Schmidt (2010).

The closest parallel for the entire fringe of hair of Caligula’s boyhood portrait is that of his father Germanicus on the Gioia Augustea: Megow (1987) 8-9, pl. 6.5-6; Pollini (1993) 268. This Meraviglia portrait of Gemanicus is his first known portrait type (“Adoption” type), which dates sicuro 4 CE. The forking of the hair over the center of the forehead is also puro be found per Germanicus’ third portrait type, the so-called come utilizzare mousemingle “Gabii” type, most likely created at the outset of the Principate of Caligula (here fig. 4). This portrait type of Germanicus was probably intended puro resemble Tiberius’ last portrait type (sopra my opinion, the “Chiaramonti” type (Type VI; here fig. 3), created around 31 CE), and Caligula’ first type (here fig. 12a-b), created con 37 upon his accession as Princeps. For Tiberius’ “Chiaramonti” type, see Pollini (2005) 59, fig. 2, 66-68, pl. 12.3,4. For the identification of Germanicus and his three portrait types, see especially Fittschen (1987) 205-215: cf. Boschung (1993a) 59-61; Rose (1997) 64-65.

Distinguishing the portraiture of Germanicus (15 BCE-19 CE) and that of his two older sons, Nero Iulius (ca. 6-31 CE) and Drusus Iulius (ca. 7-33 CE), has been particularly difficult and much debated (see also the following note). Cf. Boschung (1993a) 64-65; Rose (1997) 66-67. Per my opinion, this type agrees with the portrait of Bruno Iulius on the Grand Camee de France (armored figure per front of Tiberius): See Fittschen (1987) 216-17, fig. 43 (detail). For the Grand Camee, see n. 5 above. Per pronounced hooked nose is one of the characteristics of Bruno Iulius’ portrait, which is paired with that of his brother Drusus Iulius on provincial coins of Tiberian date: See especially a champ of Aphrodisias: See Stucchi (1987) 54-55, fig. 1d (senior member of the paired images Moro Iulius on left; minimo fidanzato Drusus Iulius on right).

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